The Yankees’ cautious Offseason program may be beneficial in the long run

Sarasota, Florida – A few Yankees executives walked into the media press room on July 31, 2007, and I wish I could tell you I had a moment of maturity. I did not do.

The Yankees were having a hard time getting the ball to Mariano Rivera, specifically with Kyle Farnsworth testing to be a three-alarm fire. Eric Janney was available from Rangers and looked perfect to close out the eighth inning. The Yankees were in business talks, but they didn’t want to give up the high prospect of a savior who was about to become a free agent.

Not only would the Yankees have been behind the Red Sox eight games in the Middle East, but they also wouldn’t have made the playoffs at all if the season had ended that day. So, when Boston snuck in to get Janie – the best seemingly improving a lot while still keeping the perfect piece off their first opponent – a group of Yankees officials told they had blown it.

Yankees assistant general manager Jan Afterman — world champion then and now — shared and said, “We’ll see.”

The Yankees have already had the best record for the big companies from there on and they’ve got a wild card. The Red Sox won the world championship, but Janie almost undermined it with how terrifying he was. The trade was actually a net positive for the Yankees.

Eric Jani
Eric Jani
AP

I’ve thought about this score often over the years to try to adjust my feelings when I wonder if the team blasted it in real time. I’m thinking about it now because a portion of this Yankees season will be played with Carlos Correa and Freddy Freeman on the horizon.

we will see.

The Yankees were in both markets for the best two-way stopping point and the first prime guy available at a free dealership. But by the time their prices fell to the area in which they fell, the Yankees had already moved on. So rather than the kind of superstars who win back pages and who knows how many games, the Yankees’ most significant financial commitment this season – at least so far – has been to get the $50 million owed to Josh Donaldson for two years.

The only reason the Yankees did this was to get a short, inexpensive, defense-oriented stop (Isiah Kiner-Falefa) and Hunter (Ben Rortvedt). They then re-signed Anthony Rizzo to a two-year, $32 million deal. So Rizzo, not Freeman, would be in the beginning, and Keener Valiva (powered by Gleber Torres), not Correa, would be in the short.

we will see.

As of Saturday morning, there was still one member of the best free agent class ever available: Trevor Story. The Yankees have been in touch with his agency, and perhaps if his price drops into his comfort zone, they will act. They love the story and his sports.

However, the Yankees, and nearly every club, were concerned about whether Storey’s erratic throw last year was caused by an elbow injury that may need action. In this case, if the team signed Story up to a one-year contract and was damaged, that team would essentially pay their salary for nothing, plus. Since Colorado made Story a qualifying bid of $18.4 million, the Yankees would lose their second-round pick if they signed him, plus $500,000 in international pool money.

And unless the Yankees have a counter-move to redirect Donaldson elsewhere, their paychecks for welfare tax purposes will swell above their third threshold ($270 million). Hal Steinbrenner initially agreed to go over the second tier ($250 million).

In the end, Steinbrenner didn’t budge much from better alternatives.

Hal Steinbrenner speaking at Yankees Spring Training
Hal Steinbrenner speaking at Yankees Spring Training
Charles Wenselberg/New York Post

With Freeman, the Yankees were still hearing six years in the $180 million range this past weekend. There were competing narratives that formed if the Freeman camp gave an ultimatum last Saturday for five years at $165 million or six years at $175 million. Atlanta was five years old, $135 million and probably went to $140 million. Whatever happened last weekend, the Braves decided not to wait for Freeman. They took a strong hold on Matt Olson by including the two prospects the first player had to have – catcher Shane Langlers and bowler Ryan Cusick.

Can the Yankees jump? Maybe not. Once he was not in Atlanta and Freeman beat the sting, his wish was to go back to his home in Los Angeles. Freeman accepted a six-year, $162 million agreement with the Dodgers that took into account state tax rates between California and Georgia and the call delay, the final present value was not far from what the Braves provided in one year less. By then, though, the Braves and Yankees had chosen other options.

For most of Korea’s post-lockdown negotiations, agent Scott Borras has been selling his client as an iconic player, which translates to world class Corey Seger (10 years, $325 million) and Francisco Lindor (10 years, $341 million). But the market will not go there.

Carlos Correa
Carlos Correa
AP

On Saturday, he let a handful of teams, including the Yankees, know Korea would take four years at record prices per year (more than $35 million), but with the opt-out to return to the market after the first two. seasons. A concept has been floated for at least four years at the Yankees. But Donaldson was already there, so Correa went to the team that cashed out Donaldson’s, the twins, in a three-year deal worth $105.3 million with opt-outs after Years 1 and 2.

So, Freeman and Korea Yankees definitely won’t be in 2022.

We’ll see about Rizzo and Kiner-Falefa, as well as those brief expectations that the Yankees overpower as reasons not to lock themselves up for the long haul with a seasoned veteran.

Freddy Freeman
Freddy Freeman
AP

Does Rizzo’s COVID-19 condition really explain his late-season relegation? Healthy, can he push OPS over .800 for the first time since 2019? Could the off-season kick that Keener-Valiva worked on with Justin Turner help him get the ball in the air for greater impact?

Anthony Volpi is the Yankees’ most beloved fan club since Derek Jeter. Will those predictions come true? Will Oswald Peraza prove he’s worth all the hype, too?

Are all these big-paying players out of their $250 million salary and displaying injuries or 2021 fears worth it? Hi Donaldson, Joey Gallo, Aaron Hicks, DJ Limayo, and Jaliber Torres.

You can have a feeling on March 19th about the opportunities not being seized. Sometimes you are right. Sometimes it happens to Eric Janney.

we will see.

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