Walt Disney World denounces the performance of the high school training team that used Native American stereotypes

Disney World officials say they “regret” that they allowed a Texas high school training team to parade in their park on Tuesday, with a show that presented stereotypes to American Indians, including repeated “scalp them” chants.

The 50-member show featured Port Neches-Groves High School Indianettes marching and dancing in fringed outfits along Main Street USA in the park’s Magic Kingdom to music inspired by Native Americans, with movements taken from said cultures.

In the footage, members can be seen clapping their hands over their mouths and shouting as a drum beats rhythmically in the background, mimicking what is stereotypically called the “war cry” of Native Americans.

“The live performance in our park did not reflect our core values, and we regret that it took place,” Florida park officials said in a statement Friday after a video with the park’s approved performance appeared online.

“It was not in line with the audition box provided by the school and we immediately took steps to ensure that this does not happen again,” the theme park officials added.

The students also marched with their arms raised in a way that seems to have been based on Western interpretations of indigenous dances.

The following students included the words “scalp ’em Indians, scalp’ em”, which was repeated while singing, according to the footage. The song is part of the Texas school’s “Cherokee” battle song.

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Disney World officials say they “regret” allowing a Texas high school training team to parade in their park on Tuesday in a show that featured stereotypes of Native Americans, including repeated chants of “scalp them.”

In the footage, members of the

In the footage, members of the “Indianettes” at Port Neches-Groves High School can be seen clapping their hands and shouting while a drum beats rhythmically in the background, mimicking what is a stereotype called the Native American “war cry.”

An audition tape provided by the school to be selected to play in the theme park resort was in contradiction with the actual performance, park officials said in a statement Friday.

According to a school employee who spoke to KBMT in Beaumont, Texas, shortly after the incident, this is the eighth time the team has performed routine at Disney World.

A spokesman for the press said that Disney never asked in advance about the planned show.

It also appears that members of the team entered the park wearing liners of Native Americans – “war hats,” as they called them – until Disney employees demanded that they be removed.

The school mascot is a Native American. Its website states that the “Indianettes” drilling rig – which the school says has 54 members – is a “tradition of more than 50 years”.

The school refers to their football stadium as the “Reservation” and has its own news feed called “Pow Wow News.” Its directory is called “The War Whoop”.

The performance of a team of at least 50 women saw high school students marching and dancing in fringed outfits along Main Street, USA, in the Magic Kingdom of the park, to music inspired by the natives, with movements taken from Native American cultures.

The performance of a team of at least 50 women saw high school students marching and dancing in fringed outfits along Main Street, USA, in the Magic Kingdom of the park, to music inspired by the natives, with movements taken from Native American cultures.

The school's website states that the

The school’s website states that the “Indianettes” drilling rig – which currently has 54 members, according to the site – is a “tradition of more than 50 years”. Pictured is an undated image of a previous Indianettes exercise team wearing headgear. The current team allegedly tried to wear liners for Tuesday’s show, but staff asked them to remove them.

Filming with Indianettes’ performance quickly went viral online, putting pressure on the park, with many considering the training team’s songs and dances to be racist.

Tara Houska, an Ojibwe tribal lawyer and former adviser to Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, called the act “dehumanizing.”

“Because a bunch of fringed kids chanting ‘scalp’ em Indians, scalp ’em’ is an honor, isn’t it? Houska posted on Twitter along with the now viral video, referring to the school’s claims that the exercise team has been a fixed part for years.

Any native who participates in @pngisd should simply accept his classmates by dehumanizing them for “tradition”, right? Too bad @DisneyParks is hosting this. ‘

“Nostalgic racism is RACISM,” Houska added the founder of “Not Your Mascots”, an organization “dedicated to the fight against native stereotypical representation in sports”.

Kelly Lynne D’Angelo, a Native American writer for TNT’s Miracle Workers – a 19th-century Wild West show – retweeted Houska’s post, adding: “99 percent of people share their outrage. compared to that they are native people. Don’t you see that’s the problem too?

She continued: “Why should we be the ones to talk about all the blatant racism against us? About our constant abuse? Why do we have to fight, with our teeth and nails, to understand that we are human beings, alive and flourishing?

“Stop that and grow,” D’Angelo added.

Houska’s complaint similarly prompted more than 11,000 people to declare the performance racist, including other tribal community leaders such as Kansas State Representative Christina Haswood, also a Native American, who implored Disney to “do better.” -a tweet on Friday.

“It’s ignorance right now,” the Navajo official said.

As part of the reaction, the social networking accounts of Port Neches-Groves High School were flooded with photos and videos of the show.

Most of the news outlets that contacted the school for comment on the incident – including DailyMail.com – received no response.

The school district, however, issued a statement to KFDM-TV in Beaumont, Texas, in which district officials said they were “aware of concerns about the performance of our band and the Indianettes at Disney World.”

“We are committed to diversity, equity and inclusion in our school district. Our district is approaching 100 years, and our Board of Directors is committed to always making the best decisions for our students, staff and communities in Port Neches and Groves, ”said the district.

The school has been rejected in recent years because of the racial connotations of its mascot, but has doubled over the years – despite the fact that many consider the references racist.

The school has been rejected in recent years because of the racial connotations of its mascot, a Native American, but has doubled over the years - despite the fact that many have considered it racist.

The school has been rejected in recent years because of the racial connotations of its mascot, a Native American, but has doubled over the years – despite the fact that many have considered it racist.

Last year, Disney announced extensive changes to the country's Disney properties and parks, in hopes of

Last year, Disney announced extensive changes to the country’s Disney properties and parks, in hopes of “creating a place where everyone is welcome.”

It seems that the Disney World show on Tuesday was broadcast live by the school’s journalism club, apparently showing pride in the training team.

Last year, Disney Parks, Experiences and Products President Josh D’Amaro announced extensive changes to Disney properties and parks in the country, hoping to “create a place where everyone is welcome.”

In the campaign, D’Amaro emphasized the “inclusion” and harmless representation of all Disney-owned races.

In the campaign, the company gave up the expressions “ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls” during the “Happily Ever After” fireworks show at Magic Kingdom, in an effort to be inclusive.

Earlier last year, before the campaign, Jungle Cruise, a staple of Disney theme parks for nearly 70 years, was revised to address years of complaints that it offered a racist view of Indians as uncivilized “savages.”

Earlier this month, new Disney CEO Bob Chapek, who took office only in January, was criticized for not condemning a bill passed in Florida on Tuesday that limits LGBTQ discussions in schools.

In a note to staff on Monday, Chapek sought to allay anger, reiterating the park’s new inclusion policies: “I want to be very clear: I and the entire management team unequivocally support our LGBTQ + employees, their families and their communities.

“We are committed to creating a company and a more inclusive world.”

Disney World employees did not immediately respond to DailyMail.com’s request for comment Saturday morning.

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